Muscle soreness during recovery week | 80/20 Endurance

Muscle soreness during recovery week

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  • #9761
    Mebennani
    Participant

    Good morning and happy new year all.

    This week is my first recovery week in the 23 IM plan and the first 3 weeks went on pretty well with high degree of compliance.

    I run on Tuesday and was a hard interval set of 2min30 and I set the pace strong on treadmill. Which was followed by strength session on Wed that incorporated new lower body exercises. From Wed on I felt strong soreness but nothing pfeventing exercising. So went on Thursday on the Bike workout with the end zone 3 test. Again I pushed as hard as I can on TT to re establish my zones and was the hardest workout in a while but also in the TT position. Felt great in the moment but soreness in quads went on while glutes and hamstring started to recover. Finally Saturday I did a 2h gravel ride although I kept it 2 and skipped the hard efforts I still felt heavy legs afterwards. I decided to skip the last workout which is the 90min run to make sure I use Sunday and Monday as recovery days for a better start next week and have few questions:

    1- was there anything wrong in the timing of sessions or intensity?
    2- particularly in the bike. It didn’t feel 20min Z3 but an all out 20min reaching almost max HR at the end. This is how I understood the test protocol being a benchmark every 4 weeks. Is that correct?
    3- is it still a good sign that I’m adapting to the new load and that soreness should get less in the future by building on same efforts?

    Thanks
    Mehdi

    #9762
    divitoc@wpsbc.org
    Participant

    Hi there! While each person’s experience with Ironman differs, I can only speak for myself. I can tell you that over the last four years of ironman training (this is the first time I’m following an 80 20 plan) I’ve experienced fatigue often following an increase of load and|or intensity. Sometimes the fatigue happens when I had my lighter weeks as well, which I wouldn’t necessarily expect. Some days, it was all I could do to push myself through a work out, either physically or mentally. Towards the end, (with the taper) is when my legs tend to feel their heaviest and just sluggish… You’re body is always looking to adapt to the loads or the expectations that we put on it. Consistency is key,, and following the course is vital. I think everyone experience is going to be different, and so long as you are listening to and staying within the couches for this plan, which is crucial to succes, you should see some amazing results. Anyhow, at the end of the day, look at what your asking your body to do .. Of course it’s going to be tired

    #9771
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    divito, great answer, thank you.

    Mehdi, I would say that ideal level of stress would place the athlete at a tiny but of soreness almost all the time until 1 week before their A race. But it’s a fine balance. I think the most likely cause of your soreness was actually the TT position and new lower strength exercises, which will not be so new in another week. To answer your direct questions:

    1. Nope, the timing was just fine.
    2. You did the TT exactly right. It’s supposed to be the hardest you can maintain for 20 or 30 minutes. However, it does not have to be tested that way every rest week. See the very bottom of the Intensity Guidelines for Triathlon for more information.
    3. Maybe. Anytime soreness causes you to alter the plan, that’s too much soreness. Once if fine, twice is concerning, three times and something is wrong. So, I’d say you overdid it with the new TT position and new lower strength, but I consider those to be exceptions and am not concerned.

    David

    #9783
    Mebennani
    Participant

    Thanks. Appreciated.

    On a side note what’s your view on low cadence/muscular strength by running low gear and high power in the build phase?.

    Thanks
    Mehdi

    #9790
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Stick with a cadence around 90rpm at all time, all intensities, all terrains until you run out of gears. This is what the Pros do. Pull up any pro cycling race and watch them in hills or flats: they are at 91rpm.

    You build your cycling force from strength training, not from low RPM.

    David

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