Plantar Fasciitis | 80/20 Endurance

Plantar Fasciitis

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  • #11573
    alancraig
    Participant

    Has anyone here dealt with plantar fasciitis? I had it in my right foot for a while. But after resting and doing rehab, the right foot feels great. However about 2-3 months in to running again, I started having the same issues in my left foot.

    Any suggestions here? Do you recommend not running at all and just doing low impact cardio while the inflammation is going down? Or maybe including some easy running?

    #11597
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Alan,

    So sorry to hear about your injury.

    If you can manage switching your run to the elliptical, you’ll be able to maintain run fitness while the injury recovers. It’s as simple as performing the scheduled run as written, but on the elliptical. Most athletes can perform elliptical training without aggravating the injury.

    If you can’t or don’t have access, then any other exercise that can get your HR close to running (cycling, rowing…)

    Regarding not running at all, that’s a tough decision. As long as the injury is getting better, keep running. If it is staying the same or worse, you gotta make a change. That’s easy to say in theory, but in practice it’s difficult. Sometimes just a week of intervention is enough to get you on track towards improvement.

    David

    #11602
    Marius T
    Participant

    And, from a broader perspective but strictly from a fitness point of view, not from medical point of view.

    How one can use the elliptical in order to prevent reoccurring injuries and still increasing his/her run fitness preparing for a race?

    Doing the intensity sessions (Z3 +) on elliptical and endurance sessions (Z1/Z2) outside?
    Or the other way around?

    Marius

    #11603
    acastaner
    Participant

    Yes, I’ve had this for the longest time. And also a tendinopathy on the lower calf/ankle on the same side (right).

    Turns out it was due to a very discreet inguinal hernia on the opposite side (left) – my body was compensating by using the right side more, unbeknownst to me.

    I had to go through about 12 sessions of physical therapy, but that barely helped because, well, I kept on running a bit too much. I also had to have custom soles made by a podologist. That helped a lot.

    Last but not least, I had to start focusing my feet and ankle a lot more while stretching. I use the “Down Dog” app for Yin Yoga (which is just deep stretching), and this app is great because it allows you to focus specific areas (such as the ankles). I also started doing “calf activation” exercises before each run, as part of my warm up routine.

    It took a while but it’s now all sorted! (including the hernia for which I went through a walk-in surgery)

    #11613
    alancraig
    Participant

    Thanks for the responses. I think it’s improving right now. After not running for a week, I went for an easy run on Wednesday. The run itself felt fine. But the foot really hurt for the rest of the day and into the next morning. It didn’t feel right until around noon yesterday (24 hours after running). So I didn’t run yesterday. By yesterday evening, if felt great.

    This morning, I did another easy run. It was uncomfortable for a couple of hours afterward, but it’s quickly improving. Just mildly sore at the moment. So it seems like with short (2-3 miles) easy runs, the recovery time is decreasing. I might just do the elliptical tomorrow, take Sunday off (church), and then see how it feels Monday. If it’s less than 100 percent, I can back off and do the elliptical.

    #11618
    Marius T
    Participant

    If I were you, I would continue to implement for the future a mixt of elliptical and running.
    Matt has in the 80/20 running book a chapter dedicated to cross training as a alternative to running more, with lots of option and strategies to balance the two.

    #11632
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    @eu 80

    If I understand correctly, your question is how to use the elliptical to prevent injures, not just manage an active injury.

    I haven’t thought a lot on this, but the concept is the same as managing an active injury: reducing load-bearing running while performing exercise that mimics running. Elliptical is 50% of the impact for 60% of the benefit (or something like that).

    My first instinct is just to cut the plan in half. Half of running as actual running, half elliptical. Split the intensity too. 40/10 elliptical and 40/10 running. Something like Week 1 all interval runs on elliptical and all easy runs outside. Week 2 the opposite.

    This is my opinion upon 5 minutes of reflection. Ask me again in a year and I’ll be curious if I give the same answer.

    David

    #11691
    alancraig
    Participant

    While I have been able to fit a few runs in, it seemed like running was stalling my recovery. So I did 40 minutes on the elliptical today. Much easier on the foot, yet still a good workout. Heart rate was consistent with an easy run. This should do the trick until the inflammation is gone.

    #11724
    Marius T
    Participant

    David,
    Thank you for your kind answer.
    I’m not sure that I understand the following: “40/10 elliptical and 40/10 running”
    If you have some time, can you explain a little bit, please?

    Marius

    #11727
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Eu,

    40/10 + 40/10 = 80/20 or 40+40+10+10=100% of your running. Meaning 40% of your running easy on the elliptical, 10% high intensity on the elliptical. Another 40% actual running easy and 10% running hard.

    David

    #11751
    alancraig
    Participant

    Have any of you tried an adaptive motion trainer? It’s similar to an elliptical machine, but the pedals are not on a fixed plane. This allows you to use a more natural running stride. I’ve seen these at the gym, but never tried them until this week. If you’re recovering from an injury or just looking for another form of cardio, this seems to be a good option.

    #11771
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Have also seen them, never used the, but the concept is the same. You want the closest exercise to running that you can perform without the load bearing.

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