RUN-WALK-RUN | 80/20 Endurance

RUN-WALK-RUN

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  • #14479
    oliver.pust
    Participant

    Has anybody tried RUN-WALK-RUN with Stryd? While I fully understand and agree from a mechanical point of view that constant (average) power should give the best race results, I am wondering if there are any physiological reasons for achieving better race results with a little faster running and short walk breaks, so that average power is identical in both cases.

    If the latter is true I would have managed a sub 4h virtual marathon recently 😉

    #14480
    Matt Fitzgerald
    Keymaster

    Quite the opposite is true, actually:

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/24748668.2020.1862493

    I suppose it’s possible that if you train with walk-runs, you’ll walk-run a slightly faster marathon than you would run a marathon, but that’s only because you’re not accustomed to continuous running. The vast majority of runners will achieve a better marathon performance if they avoid walking both in training and on race day.

    #14481
    oliver.pust
    Participant

    Hi Matt,

    Thanks for confirming what I thought should be the case. The abstract of your reference makes a very clear statement.

    Strange though that Jeff Galloway makes his very counterintuitive statement for many years.

    Best regards,
    Oliver

    #14482
    alancraig
    Participant

    Oliver – I did this for a while and used the Galloway method for my first marathon. When I started training for my second marathon, I decided to work my way into straight running. Or at least as close as I could get. By the time the actual race came, I was just taking a 30 second walk break each mile in order to hydrate and fuel. Then, I ran the last 5-6 miles without walking.

    I really didn’t find straight running to be more aerobically difficult. I hadn’t thought much about the energy used for starting and stopping, but it makes sense.
    Especially if you’re taking more frequent walk breaks.

    #14745
    DonTX
    Participant

    Thank you Matt, for posting this fascinating article. It makes sense that the constant starting up for a run interval then braking for a walk interval would use more energy. A loose analogy could be driving an automobile on the interstate versus driving in the city.

    I have spent the last two years doing run/walk intervals. Everything from the couch to 5k, to a 10k, to HMs. When I finished the HM after a run-walk, I still felt exhausted. This year, since May, I’ve been training with the 80/20 plans. I did the 5k plan first, and am now about half way through the HM level 2, pace plan. I did the 1:50 ER run two weeks ago, and came through it ok. I have the 2:00 ER this Saturday and that will be another good test. But these runs are by far the furthest I’ve run straight through, and they are survivable. 🙂

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