, Author at 80/20 Endurance

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  • in reply to: Exercise and Aging #14250
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    A subject near and dear to my heart…

    I’m on the verge of 50, so pretty close to your age and my experience has been pretty similar, however I have a few different takeaways based on my experience.

    While I never really let myself get “out of shape” since high school, I did tend to just weight lift a little, run or bike a little, play tennis a little, etc until about 12 years ago when my wife announced she wanted to run a marathon by year-end after having our 2nd child in February. That prompted a major uptick in the “volume” of my training, and I enjoyed many years of continued improvement heretofore unknown to me…setting PRs at all distances, qualifying for the Boston marathon, then getting into ultra marathons and duathlons etc to the extent you could say I was full-on addicted to endurance sports.

    I’m not particularly talented for this stuff either, I am definitely fast-twitch by nature and thus it took many years of steady training, planning, etc to get myself where it could be objectively said I was “good” at running.

    However not only are there diminishing returns to this training lifestyle, I think it can easily be taken too far and cause problems. I’ve had stress fractures and other overuse injuries, none of which I’d have had otherwise – and in 2018 I had to have hip surgery. Currently I have an issue with my knee (patellofemoral syndrome or PFS or “runners knee”) that is resistant to all treatment and for which I flatly refuse to get surgery due to the profoundly bad record of surgery correcting this issue. I’ve “run myself into the ground” you could say. I have other aches and pains regularly that I wouldn’t have without my weekly schedule of training, I guess that’s just a byproduct of being 50+ and in this lifestyle. It’s been fun hitting all those benchmarks but now at the other end of it I’m not sure I’d say it was worth it if I am going to be hobbled from here onward.

    So there is some ambiguous “balance” that should be achieved but where that actually is I don’t know. At a High School reunion recently there wasn’t a guy there that was as fit/healthy as I looked, so there’s that at least. 🙂

    in reply to: Weight Training #13991
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Would a bodyweight routine be considered part of that banned strength work for upper body?

    Such as core work (planks, sit ups and ab stuff), pushups, pullups, & chinups?

    I’m not adding any mass like in a traditional strength routine, just maintaining some basic ability now that I’m 50+. Of course, I don’t think the pros are doing a lot of pushups and chinups so I probably have my answer there.

    in reply to: Garmin VO2 Max #13936
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    You can get a bike Vo2max recording but it requires having a power meter. I’m not aware of any Vo2max for swimming in Garmin’s suite but maybe I missed it since I personally don’t swim unless I have to.

    in reply to: Garmin VO2 Max #13863
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Yes, the algorithm definitely takes into account your long runs in order to estimate your marathon time. I’m not sure (but inclined to think) that the 5K estimate is also skewed towards hard/shorter efforts in training but definitely the marathon will not estimate correctly until you start doing 17-18+ mile runs.

    in reply to: Garmin VO2 Max #13856
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    I like to follow the Garmin measurements but I don’t live by them. Funny that yours doesn’t seem to address weather conditions, I think mine does a pretty good job of accounting for heat/humidity. Hey, does your watch have the Heat Acclimation score? Maybe if it doesn’t have that feature it won’t be able to let it influence the correct VO2max score. I’ve been sitting at 100% acclimation according to Garmin since early June, that’s what happens when conditions are constantly sitting at a dewpoint of 67+ when I run.

    Back on the Vo2max score: Currently I’m on a trend of Vo2max going up according to Garmin, so I’ll take that as a positive (ha ha) but I do typically ignore it when it says things are going south. I have done a ton of low-zone work in previous training cycles, the FirstBeat algorithms that Garmin employs REALLY do not like that style of training!

    Also note that Garmin’s algorithms depend on an accurate estimate of your max HR. If MHR is listed as too high, it will inflate your Vo2max score, and vice versa. I like to use the race estimates it gives to see how realistic the score might be.

    in reply to: Race day nutrition #13854
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Ha ha, I know that’s the general reputation for prunes (dried plums) but I myself have never had any issue. I’m not sure why they’d be any worse than raisins if you think about it, at least they haven’t been for me.

    in reply to: Race day nutrition #13838
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    You didn’t say what your race distance/length is but for long events (marathons and ultramarathons and up), my go to is Overnight Oats. You can make them as sweet or non-sweet as you like. The oats are good “slow” carbs and I like the taste.

    1/2 cup of oats
    1/2 cup of milk
    + whatever mixings you like. I like a random mix of almond butter, raisins (or prunes), sliced banana, cinnamon, honey, a pinch of salt or potassium powder, sometimes a partial scoop of protein powder, etc. Whatever I have on hand or in the mood for.

    As for Gels, a long time ago Matt suggested (somewhere, in a book or a blog) Accel Gels that have a mix of protein+carbs. These work very well for me.

    in reply to: Matt’s Blog on HRV4 & DFa1 #13477
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Hold the phone, I’m not so sure it would be all that useful to have as a data field.

    I did a few outdoor tests using my Polar H9 (a few truly easy runs and 1 cycle) and in reviewing Runalyze’s DFA1 graph after the fact, the results were very mixed.

    The cycle seemed to indicate DFA1 might offer a good way for thresholds as at no point on my bike (an easy 60min spin in 93 degree “feels like” conditions) did I pass the threshold, only briefly touching it in spots.

    But both runs were well under the .75 threshold for all but the points when I took a break (to let my dogs cool off in a creek). Both of these runs felt easy RPE-wise and HR was in check as well. But DFA1 would indicate I was well over my Aerobic Threshold the entire time.

    in reply to: Matt’s Blog on HRV4 & DFa1 #13403
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Neat, thanks Matt.

    in reply to: Passive Exoskeletons in Running #13248
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Okay well I didn’t intend to sound snarky, I’m genuinely curious. Moreso from a theoretical standpoint than practical however.

    in reply to: Passive Exoskeletons in Running #13241
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    When you say “exoskeleton” are you referring to what most of us would call a shoe?

    in reply to: Confounded by Declining Performance YoY #13016
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Good feedback guys, thanks.

    I was also doing a lot more volume last year too, not necessarily with running but with a lot more cross training hours. I felt pretty tired all the time and it often seemed like there wasn’t as much “fluidity” in my HR range, like my heart was too “tired” to easily ramp up to the upper registers. Maybe that has something to do with the big difference in HR average then and now.

    in reply to: Confounded by Declining Performance YoY #12990
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    Thanks Matt – I guess some old habits are hard to break.

    Have you ever seen that phenomenon I described when I was training low HR mostly, higher efforts being harder to tolerate? It’s like I got locked into one intensity level and anything above that was a shock to the system.

    in reply to: Duration of CP Test #12981
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    So the end result was your CP is lower and therefore you’re seeing better progress in your training?

    I wonder if that’s simply coinciding with the change in conditions outside? I’ve had to adjust my CP once temps/humidity got to where the previous zones no longer applied.

    However I am dealing with what appears to be a continually declining performance trend so I’m re-evaluating. I’m going to start a separate thread on that for feedback though.

    in reply to: Cross Training #12980
    BrianNSC
    Participant

    That’s great. I’m curious what kind of pace you were doing that was equivalent to an easy run heartrate wise?

    There are some conversion tables online where you can estimate the effort, and you can use the Stryd Workout CIQ app and enter the incline % and it will give you the appropriate wattage. When I do that it comes in pretty close to the following estimates of pace conversion:

    15% Grade:
    3mph (20:00min/mile) = 10:06min/mile
    3.5mph (17:30min/mile) = 8:40min/mile
    4mph (15:00min/mile) = 7:33min/mile

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)