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  • in reply to: Stryd Power off – how to adjust rFTP? #15409
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Just had a thought… anyone willing to change their weight in Stryd to, say 50 pounds for a few runs, then switch it to say, 200 pounds for a few runs? How does that change the reported Power output for a given weight/pace?

    in reply to: Stryd Power off – how to adjust rFTP? #15408
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    winoria, I can’t argue with any of your points, and I don’t have a perfect answer. For me it’s academic:

    – An accelerometer requires a mass value for an accurate power calculation.
    – Unless the accelerometer adjusts for a change in mass, it will continue to drift away from accuracy during a long activity.

    I can’t explain why Stryd recommends to not change your weight. Makes no sense to me, but there must be a reason.

    However, I would not stress to much about this. If I were to make a list of all the advantages and disadvantages of using Pace, Power or HR as a primary measure of run intensity, Power would still come out on top, even with this issue. Remember, this issue applies to Pace just as much as does to Power. The intensity required to run 7:00 per mile is different at 160 pounds than 165 pounds. Over a long event, you have the same problem with Pace as you do with Power in that the mass change means less effort to maintain a given Pace.

    I think the best-balanced approach is to change your weight in Stryd every 5 pounds you gain/lose when training, and just accept the 3% drift in power accuracy (5 pounds out of 160) over the duration of a long event as a necessary margin of error.

    David

    in reply to: CV zone question #15407
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Chris,

    LTHR is actually the fastest pace you can maintain for 60 minutes. This is an unreasonable test for athletes to perform every rest week, so we simulate and estimate that 60 minutes with the the more palatable 20-minute test.

    And, the test is not based on the full 20 minutes, it is based on the final 15 of the 20-minute test. There is just going to be some squishy numbers, particularly for HR, when not performing a full 60-minute test.

    Additionally, when using HR for anything higher than Zone 3, it’s going to take several minutes for your HR to “catch up” and it is common to not hit HR targets for Zone 3+. Using Pace or Power for those high intensity intervals is better. In fact, Pace and Power will be better for you across the board, as we find the 20-minute LTHR tests more closely align with Pace and Power over HR.

    Regardless, you should be able to run faster for 5 minutes than 20, so the result of the workout should be the same regardless of what BPM you hit: CV is faster than LTHR, so run those 5 minutes faster than what you ran for your 20 minute test.

    David

    in reply to: How to properly skip a year of triathlon racing #15345
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    I see now. You are more observant than I am, I did not catch that the two posts came from the same individual! I just get into “triage” mode sometimes and answer the question at hand.

    I’m sure Yuri has good reasons for considering both possibilities!

    David

    in reply to: Maintenance Vs. Race Weight Plans #15344
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Gerald, I think I am misunderstanding the question. Can you clarify the difference between Racing Weight and Racing Weight Quick Start. It’s the latter I’m not familiar with.

    in reply to: How to properly skip a year of triathlon racing #15333
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    D, can you be more specific about the conflicting posts.

    Also, even in this post, I make it clear, “there are many, many ways to do this…” That was one of…6? different methods I could have recommended, but chose the best method based on the limited feedback available.

    David

    in reply to: Garmin: Exceeded maximum number of workouts #15332
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Rex, I *think* Gerald is right, this is just cosmetic. Garmin devices can only holds between 20 and 200 workouts at a time (depends on the device). It will cycle through those workouts each sync so that you have at least the next 20. Should not impact functionality.

    Most Garmin devices don’t give you the error, they just don’t sync past their limit.

    David

    in reply to: How to run a marathon while on an IM plan #15268
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Yury,

    Yes, this is complicated. It’s important to understand that while marathon and Ironman are similar, they are two very different sports. There is a reason there are no professional cross-over athletes. You can be good at both, you can only be great at one at a time.

    Training for an IM and a Marathon at the same time is like trying to make something both a pizza and a cake at the same time. You can bake one or the other.

    The best decision is to split them up by at least 12 weeks and train for them separately. If you must include a marathon as part of Ironman training:

    – Replace your shortest cycling workout with a run and follow the workout as a run
    – Add a run of 60-90 minutes each week, all Zone 1-2
    – Increase your longest run each week by 30 minutes, but no longer than 3 hours

    We do offer a custom plan service that can help with this, see https://www.8020endurance.com/custom-plans-and-coaching/

    David

    in reply to: Zone X Confusion #15266
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Nothing wrong with Zone X for certain distances, and is actually the preferred intensity for many distances.

    Zone X is not bad, it just has limited use. The danger of Zone X is that it’s the default moderate intensity that athletes adopt, and is the primary culprit of the moderate intensity rut” athletes fall into. But, for Marathon, Half Marathon, and many Cycling distances, that is the intensity you’ll race in and so you do want to add it to your training.

    Think of Zone X as a prescription medication. If taken without guidance, it’s harmful. If taken in the correct dose, only as needed, it’s helpful. Like some prescriptions medications, Zone X is the most “abused” intensity, so it has a poor reputation. But, when used properly, it’s the right intensity for certain circumstances, including your cycling plan.

    David

    in reply to: How to properly skip a year of triathlon racing #15265
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Yury, there are many, many ways to do this. Here’s one method:

    Stitch together multiple 80/20 offseason and shorter plans with a week or rest in between:

    Triathlon Racing Weight 6 weeks
    Run Endurance 7 Weeks
    40K FTP Boost 12 weeks
    Run Endurance 11 Weeks
    Triathlon Maintenance 12 weeks

    That’s 52 weeks if you add a rest week in-between each plan.

    David

    in reply to: adding swim/bike to a running plan #15264
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    This is also documented in the Cross-training section of https://www.8020endurance.com/understanding-your-8020-run-plan/

    David

    in reply to: Maintenance Vs. Race Weight Plans #15263
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Rev, be sure to check out https://www.8020endurance.com/triathlon-level-comparison/ to do a direct comparison. The Racing Weight plans provide much more granular options, as there are 4 levels. And, if you add 1.5 hours to the Maintenance plan, it will be 9 hours, the equivalent of the Level 3 Racing Weight plan.

    Other than the differences you see on the comparison chart, the difference between the two plans are in the title: one is for weight management, the other for fitness maintenance.

    David

    in reply to: Changing Heart Rate Zone source for bike rides #15217
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    I can explain the 61 vs. 66 minutes.

    TP does not allow for zones be immediately adjacent, for various reasons zones must overlap in TP by one unit (bpm, watt, second). Zone 1 is, for example, is 119-134 bpm and Zone 2 is 134 to 149 bpm. Therefore, Zone 1 and Zone 2 share 1bpm at 134 etc. all the way up the zone chain.

    You spent a total of 5 minutes right at the threshold of a zone where the zones overlap. When you are at 134bpm (in this example), TP will add that time to both Zone 1 and Zone 2.

    This phenomenon is especially noticeable when using HR, as going from Zone 1 to Zone 4, for example in an interval workout, means that your HR has to slowly pass through Zone 1 to 2 to X to 3 to Y to 4 and then back down. With Pace and Power, however you can go instantly from 160 watts to 300 watts and not pass thorough the other zones at all.

    David

    in reply to: 12 Month Ironman Training Plan #15204
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    D,

    Yes, sort of with one modification. Although the Maintenance plan is not a heavy plan, doing it back-to-back with the IM plan results in 35 straight weeks of formal training. That’s a long time.

    So, consider a 2-week break after Week 10 of the Maintenance plan. Not completely off, but maybe just 4 hours a week of swim, bike and run as you feel. Don’t be afraid to lose a bit of fitness in those two weeks, it’s part of the process.

    David

    in reply to: Zone Updates from Foundation Run #15187
    David Warden
    Keymaster

    Charles,

    Testing should be done at least every 6 weeks, so if you are going beyond that period, it’s time to test again. If less than 6 weeks and you are feeling tired, punt.

    If 6 weeks or more, find a day over the next 7 days that appears to be where you will be the most recovered. If you are using the PMC, then this should be clear. Pick your best TSB day in the next week to test.

    David

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,061 total)